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Local

‘Pippin’ being performed at BGSU

The Broadway hit was originally supposed to be performed in 2020 but was canceled due to the outbreak of COVID-19. “We were literally in the middle of rehearsals when the show got canceled and it feels really good to come back full circle to ‘Pippin,’” the musical’s director, Michael ‘Doc’ Ellison, said. Rehearsals started back up in February and the final weeks are quickly approaching. “I’m super grateful for this opportunity and I can’t wait. It’s a challenge … because there is so much to do in such a little time,” lead actor Ian Keller said. Showtimes are at 8 p.m. from April 7 to 9 and 2 p.m. from April 9 to 10.

New BG school building levy

The Bowling Green Board of Education met once again to debate how they can finance a new school building. Questions came as board members agreed that Bowling Green needs new school buildings, like, how much they think voters are willing to pay and how long can they wait before taking any big steps. According to the BG Independent News, the board was unable to levy for a consolidated elementary school but is now hoping for a new high school building.

BGSU Speech and Debate Team place in national championships

On March 17-20 the BGSU Falcon Forensics, Speech and Debate team placed third in the nation at the 2022 National Online Forensics Championships. The team was led by Allison Sturley and Phoenix Anson, and was provided coaching by Director of Forensics, Speech and Debate, Paul Wesley Alday and teaching assistants, Jules Patalita and Felicity Sena Dogbaste. According to the Sentinel-Tribune, this is the 86th national tournament that BGSU has competed in since 1919.

BGSU Republicans face low membership

BGSU’s College Republicans student organization is voicing their concern about a lack of membership, especially as the year comes to an end. “We don’t have the attendance, we don’t have the interaction with members to really go out, do things and have productive meetings,” Vice President David Mele said. Mele also said membership is the key to survival in student organizations. Without it, organizations might have to suspend activities or even shut down. Anyone looking to join an organization can find all available on-campus groups through BGSU Presence or by the student organizations webpage on BGSU’s website.

State

Ohio Supreme Court debates changing primary date

The Ohio Supreme Court turned down the request made by Democratic leaders to change the May 3 primary date. According to the Ohio Capital Journal, House Minority Leader, Allison Russo and State Senator, Vernon Sykes, motioned to move the date in order to help the commission finish their work without worrying about election deadlines. Republican leaders accused Democrats of attempting to “circumvent the power of the General Assembly” which resulted in the motion being denied.

COVID-19 creates need for therapists in greater Cleveland

There is a greater need, now more than ever, for mental health help, according to Leslie Heinberg, Vice Chair of Psychology in the Cleveland Clinic Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology. Adults, children and families are often having to wait four to six months for appointments, due to a shortage of therapists according to statistics found in an Cleveland.com. This change has been especially hard on children during the COVID-19 pandemic as they have had to adjust to online learning and readjust back to in-person.

Marines return to U.S. 

Four U.S. Marines were killed in an Osprey aircraft crash on March 18 during a NATO exercise. Among them was Gunnery Sgt. James W. Speedy, 30, of Cambridge, Ohio. The aircraft was out on a training mission in Nordland County, according to NBC4. The bodies of the deceased were placed on board an Air National Guard military transport aircraft and will return to their families before being moved to their final resting places, according to their families’ wishes.

DeWine at State of the State

In his 2022 State of the State address, Governor Mike DeWine focused heavily on mental health during this time of crisis and addressed many strong leaders. “The state of our state is strong. Ohio is strong,” he said. “What unites us is much stronger than what divides us.” Without offering cost estimates or specifics, DeWine made a case for bringing more mental health care services to underserved communities, according to the Ohio Capital Journal. 

National

Lifesaving meds delivered to Ukraine

Despite the recent Russian invasions in Ukraine, a U.S.-funded group that has been operating in Ukraine for more than 20 years, is still able to move in and out of the country. The Alliance for Public Health brings lifesaving medicines to treat HIV and opioid addiction to thousands of patients. The U.S. Agency for International Development as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have donated millions of dollars to this cause, according to AP News. The group needed to create a “risk management plan” in case fighting broke out in the area in which they are working.

New budget developments

As part of the 2023 fiscal budget, President Joe Biden is expected to propose a minimum tax on billionaires. This plan will mostly target the roughly 700 billionaires that live in the country and will include a 20% minimum tax rate on all households worth more than $100 million. According to Reuters.com, within the next decade, this tax will help reduce the budget deficit by almost $360 billion.

Colorado wildfires

According to the Boulder Office of Emergency Management, evacuation orders were sent out for 8,000 homes in the Boulder, Colorado area as a wildfire has been growing rapidly. This affected over 19,000 people not far from the site of a destructive wildfire, that leveled more than 1,000 homes in 2021. According to NPR, the fire has been generally moving southeast toward Eldorado Springs.

Nationwide COVID-19 update

The Biden administration is facing an upcoming deadline to end or extend the current restrictions on asylum for migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. Due to this public health order, nearly 1.7 million migrants have been expelled from the U.S. since March 2020 but as COVID-19 rates are continuously plunging, people are beginning to question the scientific grounds. According to AP News, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is under great pressure to end Title 42 and fully restore asylum. 

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