In a survey of 11 College Republicans, five said that they were happy with President Trump’s performance, three were not and another three were not sure yet.

          Almost a year after the 2016 presidential election, the group is mixed on how the President has performed on some of his major campaign promises.

          One of the first promises that President Trump fulfilled was backing the United States out of the Paris Climate Accord.

          “I generally agree with his decision to get us out of it. The benefits are too small to validate the costs,” sophomore Shaun Sager said. “I think the way the agreement has gone about legislating carbon emissions regulating that some countries get to start later, some now, is not creating a fair system for America.”

          Sophomore Hayden Brown thinks removing the country from the agreement is the first step to nationalism.

          “I think that Trump is trying to get a sense of revitalization of nationalism into the country. We’ve been in this globalist mindset for eight or nine years now. I like the idea of America first,” Brown said.

          The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was another high priority on President Trump’s list when he was elected into office. When he announced that it was coming to an end, cities and universities across the nation deemed themselves as a ‘safe city’ or ‘safe campus’ despite the administration’s threats to revoke funding if they did so.

          David Jenkins, Treasurer, thinks that it is good to force Congress to take care of this issue, but Trump should not end the program in the meantime.

          “For me personally, I think that he’s failing Dreamers. These are people that came into the U.S. as children; they were brought here. It wasn’t their decision to come,” Jenkins said. “I think it’s a good decision to force Congress to finally act upon the issue, but ending the program with just a couple of months instead of trying to force politics play out is a mistake.”

          Jenkins went on to say if the program was changed to make Dreamers legal, they should not be the first ones granted full citizenship.

          “Definitely to the back of the line. There are still a lot of people waiting to come into the country who have done everything right and haven’t gotten nearly as far in becoming citizens,” he said.

          On the issue of the infamous wall that would separate Mexico and the U.S., members were torn over Trump’s idea of it.

          “I was for the wall and am still for the wall. I think the net cost of illegal immigration is due to a mix of tax dollars funding programs but more so lost wages, money being sent home, the wall would be paid for several times over,” Sager said.

          Others think that there can be an alternative to a physical wall.

          “I like the spirit of the wall more than the physical one. Illegal immigration has been cut down during this administration and the return of respect for the rule of law in this nation. I think that is a good step forward,” junior Nathan Higgins said.

          Sophomore Dylan Pipic thinks the border should be defended by people instead of something physical.

          “When we look at the cost of maintaining something of this caliber, which is probably going to be one of the greatest public works in recent times, why pay to have a physical wall when there are thousands of veterans returning from war?” Pipic said. “We could put that money to employ them. If the money is going to go somewhere, why not put it to the people?”

          The group agrees that the Republican Party has fallen flat on the healthcare issue although the president, Garrett Reynolds, believes Trump made the right choice signing an executive order to force Congress to act on this issue.

          Higgins feels that Republican members of Congress failed in their promise to implement a new healthcare plan.

          “I feel that it’s difficult to trust them when during the Obama administration, they were saying how we need to stop this terrible healthcare plan from going through,” he said. “The Republicans said we’re going to repeal if you elect us. But then they said, oh wait, we need to work through the specifics before we pass it, and nothing is getting done.”

          The temporary travel ban was considered to be a good move by the President by some in the group.

          “I think it’s a great thing. These nations that were banned typically don’t have any background information. It makes sense that we should at least figure out the situation that’s going on before we let them in without background checks,” sophomore Nathan Feffer said.

          Sager agrees with and thinks that it is the President’s job to protect his citizens.

          “I think that people go crazy the second that the list was announced. At the end of the day, I don’t see a problem with a temporary restriction. We see the radical ideologies rising from these nations who are incompatible with western values and is dangerous to our nation,” Sager said. “I think the president has the right and duty to protect the citizens by restricting immigration until a problem can be solved.”

          With over three years of President Trump’s first term to go, the group had some suggestions on how he could win them over going forward.

          “Keep Tweeting. It gives a voice to the president. Have we ever had a president that came out and spoke his mind and was honest with people? It proves that he’s human, and we can connect with him. Whether you agree with him or not is up to you,” Feffer said.

          All Pipic asks is Trump to keep the country moving forward.

                    “As long as he has learned and developed the country in some way by the time he leaves office, I think it will have been a great presidency,” he said.

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